Category: Talk Tips To Go


Spring Into Speech and Language Skills!

By Alexa Demyan,

Spring officially arrived on March 20, bringing with it a variety of fun opportunities to practice speech, language, and social skills! Whether you are looking for something to do indoors on a rainy day or outside in the sunshine, there are so many different ways to practice communication skills!

By Amanda Cifuentes

Family-Friendly St. Patrick’s Day Activities at Home!

By Alexa Demyan,

Happy March! As we slowly move toward Spring, many parents are more excited than ever for warm weather and the ability enjoy the outdoors as a family! Because March weather can be unpredictable, we wanted to share are a few activities for speech and language practice that can be done no matter the weather! 

Search for Shamrocks!

Outside: Search for shamrocks, leaves, pine needles, or anything else green! Talk about how these items are similar and different with descriptive language (Is it small, big, soft, hard, shiny, sharp, soft?).

Inside: Do the same activity, but see how many green items you can find in your home. In addition to the descriptions listed above, this might lead to even more descriptive language (Where does it belong in the house? What category is it in? What do you do with it?). 


Make a Rainbow!

Outside: Use chalk to draw a rainbow on the sidewalk or your driveway. While drawing, practice an articulation target word for each color that you use!

Inside: Create a rainbow using whatever craft materials you have at home – maybe use several different materials in one picture! Practice speech sounds while drawing and then hang the rainbows around your house for springtime cheerfulness! 


Do Some Yoga and Notice How You Feel!

Outside or inside, this can be a great way to move your body. Work in some language practice by describing how your body and brain feel when you do yoga! Does your brain feel calm, energized, or relaxed? Does stretching feel good on your arms, legs, back, or neck? 

Check out this site for some St. Patrick’s Day themed yoga poses for kids!

Valentine’s Day Activities at Home!

By Alexa Demyan,

By Natalie Day, MS, CCC-SLP

We are all used to the slump that comes with the cold days of January and February – the holidays are over and we are stuck inside (this year more than ever). That is why we love Valentine’s Day! A day for bright colors and spreading love, perfectly timed for when we really need a mid-winter mood boost. Why not dive into Valentine’s Day a little more this year? Here are some fun ways for your family to do so while getting some speech and language practice in:

Write Valentines for your family, friends, and neighbors.

Practice letter-writing format, complete sentences, and lots of descriptive vocabulary to tell someone why they are special to you! Deliver them to porches or send them through the mail as a socially distant way to spread the love.


Read Valentine’s Day books.

Hugs & Kisses for the Grouchy Lady Bug
By Eric Carle teaches us about making the world a kinder place

Mr. Goat’s Valentine
By Eve Bunting and is about the search for the perfect present to express Mr. Goat’s love

Little Ant’s Valentine
A kid-sized version of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew


Do a Valentine’s Scavenger Hunt.

Have kids cut hearts out of construction paper, then parents can write words on them for practice. They can be articulation targets, sight words, spelling words, anything! Then, hide them throughout the house and have kids search for them.

How to Utilize a Timeless Author’s Books to Develop Speech & Language Skills

By Alexa Demyan,

Dr. Seuss is a household name. Did you know his books can be used to develop speech & language skills? The next time you read one of your favorite Dr. Seuss books with your family, try incorporating these tips from our speech-language pathologists!

Developing Vocabulary: Books are great for learning new vocabulary pertaining to a particular topic/theme. Use a Dr. Seuss book to plan a week (or even month) of themed activities to help promote your child’s vocabulary growth. Each activity will help build upon your child’s previous knowledge/experience.

If using, Horton Hears a Who!, you can pretend to be elephants, make elephant hats, talk about how an elephant’s body parts are similar/different than your own, use pom-poms to make clovers, or make edible clovers using Rice Krispies cereal

Developing Early Literacy Skills: Phonological awareness, the understanding of how sounds are put together to form words, is a foundational pre-literacy skill. The ability to identify and produce rhyming words is included in this. Dr. Seuss books, such as One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, are full of rhyming words. As your child becomes familiar with a story, pause and let them fill in the missing words. 

Developing Articulation Skills: Dr. Seuss books are full of motivating “tongue tanglers” that can be used to reinforce clear articulation skills. Pick a book full of your child’s target sound(s) and have fun! Fox in Socks is great for working on the /s/ sound. 


Developing Social Skills:·        

Yertle the Turtle: Targets sympathy and the importance of caring for others.·        

The Big Brag: A lesson surrounding bragging.·        

What Was I Scared Of: Perfect for discussing fears and how to overcome them.·        

Green Eggs and Ham: Conveys the importance of being open-minded/flexible. 

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This post written for you by Samantha Secrist, M.A., CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center

Rainy Day Activities

By Alexa Demyan,

When the forecast is projecting for rain, rain and more rain, it may seem daunting if you’ve got little ones at home. But no worries- Miss Abbey has shared all of her go-to rainy day activities that she does with her own children at home!
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☔️𝐒𝐢𝐭 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐫𝐜𝐡 𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐫 𝐮𝐦𝐛𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐥𝐚𝐬 𝐝𝐮𝐫𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐬𝐧𝐚𝐜𝐤/ 𝐥𝐮𝐧𝐜𝐡 𝐭𝐢𝐦𝐞. 𝐓𝐚𝐥𝐤 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭:
• Where they’re eating
• What they’re eating
• What’s happening around them
• Requests for “more” snack or make choices between snacks
• The flavors and textures of the snack (crunchy, chewy, sweet, salty, sour, smooth, slimy, etc)
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☔️ 𝐅𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐩𝐮𝐝𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐬 𝐢𝐧 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐲𝐚𝐫𝐝 𝐨𝐫 𝐚𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐲𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐧𝐞𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐛𝐨𝐫𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐝. 𝐓𝐚𝐥𝐤 𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐭:
• Size concepts: are the puddles you find big, medium, or small
• Comparisons: are the puddles bigger/smaller than your child’s boots or your boots
• Quantity concepts: is a lot or a little water in the puddle, how many puddles you found (give a specific number, or use general terms such as one, a lot, a few)
• Location concepts: where are you finding puddles (on the sidewalk, on the driveway, beside the mailbox, next to the curb, in the grass, etc)
• Verbs: splash with your hands, jump with both feet, stomp with one foot, march, hop on one foot, etc. Use this activity to talk about “what happened?”
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☔️ 𝐆𝐨 𝐨𝐧 𝐚 𝐰𝐚𝐥𝐤!
• Have children help plan what they need for a walk in the rain (boots vs shoes, raincoat vs a regular jacket, hat and/or umbrella)
• Practice describing words by talking about the size/colors/other features of houses you see
• Practice one speech word for each house you pass or each sidewalk square
• Point out objects that have your speech sound
• Bring a bucket and fill it with treasures you find (sticks, rocks, leaves, acorns, pinecones, mulch, flowers). When you get home, you can sort the items by category, size, color, etc.

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This post written for you by Abbey Vielhaber, M.A., CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center