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Spring Activities for Babies and Toddlers

By Alexa Demyan,

Language: Use the same phrases (“Look! I found a…”) and simple sentences. Use gestures and pointing to help encourage understanding. Label items and pictures (flower, duck) but also describe them (pretty, cold, wet). Encourage following directions (“Give the flower to x.” “Find the little duck”).

Speech: Copy your baby’s sounds in a back and forth manner. Use fun sounds and words (“whee!,” “ooooo,” “ohhhh,” “wow,” “uh oh,” “oh no!”). Try to get face to face as much as possible so your child can see your mouth. Speak slowly, emphasize important words (“The bird is ON the fence!”), stretch out sounds in words (“uuuuuhhhhppp,” “sssssun”) to draw attention to them.

Cognitive/concepts: Talk about WHERE things are (up/down/in/out/on/off), the SIZE of things (big/little), the FEEL of things (wet/dry), COLORS (red, blue, yellow, green), HOW MANY there are (counting, 1, 2, 3, more).

Literacy:  It’s okay to read the same book over and over! Or the same page! This encourages learning through repetition. Follow the words from left to right with your finger as you read. Ask questions (“Where did he go?” “What is the baby doing?”). Make comments (“I see a yellow duck”).  You don’t have to read the book from start to finish, just talk about it, interact with it and your child, and have fun!

Gross motor: Go on a nature scavenger hunt – find leaves, sticks, rocks, flowers, etc. Draw with sidewalk chalk – you can draw out an obstacle course (footsteps to walk on, then lines to jump over, etc.). Crawl through a big box like a tunnel. Roll, bounce, and throw a ball. Take any indoor movement activities OUTSIDE!

Fine motor: Use any nature items (leaves, flowers) to paint. Use a fork to ‘stamp’ the petals of flowers. Use a dropper with watercolors or use markers to draw on coffee filters then clip with a clothes pin to make a butterfly! Fill buckets with different sizes of rocks to move, sort, dump, etc.

Sensory: Take a walk and smell the flowers. Sit/walk in the grass with bare feet. Create a spring bin – fill a small, shallow tray with outdoor items (leaves, grass, flowers, dirt, rocks) and add shovels, scoops, fake bugs, and small pots to dump and fill. Fill a small tub with water and add rubber ducks, rocks, sticks, leaves, etc. Talk about what you and your child are doing as you play!

Music: “Oh where, oh where has my little duck gone?” (to the tune of “Oh where, oh where has my little dog gone?”), “Put the flower on your nose, on your nose. Put the flower on your head, on your head…” (to the tune of “If you’re happy and you know it”), “5 Little Ducks Went Out One Day.”  Hold long ribbons and dance and swirl like the wind.

Social/Emotional: Decorate paper plates with duck/chick/flower faces and talk about emotions (happy, sad, mad, sleepy). Talk about feelings when you read them in a book or story or in real life situations. Label/talk about how your child might be feeling when they don’t have the words to tell you. Stay close when big emotions come but allow your child to calm down before trying to talk with him/her, then talk about the situation.

Happy Spring from Columbus Speech & Hearing Center! 

If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s speech and language development, contact Lora McConnell, M.A., CCC-SLP at (614) 261-5462 or lmcconnell@columbusspeech.org.

Sensory Bin Fun!

By Alexa Demyan,

Sensory bins are a favorite tool of speech therapists, teachers and parents alike! They provide an immersive, hands-on opportunity for children to practice their speech and language skills. Here’s what you need to know to integrate this easy tool into your life.

What is a sensory bin?

Tub or container filled with materials carefully selected to stimulate senses.


Why use sensory bins?

Because they are FUN and ENGAGING for all. And you can target…

Expressive/Receptive Language:

  • Expand vocabulary (nouns, verbs, adjectives)
  • Find objects (e.g. “Where is the __?”)
  • Following directions (e.g. “Put beans in the bowl and dump it out”)

Social/Play Skills:

  • Take turns and share objects
  • Asking for objects
  • Commenting on what each person is doing
  • Pretend play
  • Conversation (e.g. “I like the _. What do you like?”)

Articulation:

  • Find objects/materials with the targeted sound (e.g. “sand” for /s/, “cars” for /k/)

How can I make one?

Buy a small or large tub (usually $2-10) and fill it with different materials and textures:

  • Soft: cotton balls, kinetic sand, feathers, marshmallows, pompoms
  • Squishy: packing peanuts, cooked pasta, squishy toys, sponges
  • Hard: beans, corn, rice, pasta, aquarium rocks, buttons, shells, beads, wood, Legos, chickpeas
  • Wet: ice cubes, water, jelly beads, shaving cream, gelatin
  • Objects: puzzle pieces, cars, balls, animal figures, shovels, scoopers, tongs, blocks, magnets, bowls


Want to share?  This article is a sharable PDF as well.


Sensory Bin Inspiration!

Here are some of our favorite sensory bins we’ve created.

Winter Sensory Bin

When winter-themed decorations go on clearance at the craft stores, our therapists stock up! Here are ways you can use winter-themed items to target speech and language skills

  • Prepositions and following directions
  • Categories
  • Adjectives and describing
  • Answering questions
  • Story creation/narration
  • Vocabulary

Fall Sensory Bin

This fall-themed sensory bin is perfect, especially if you love pumpkins!

  • Basic Concepts: Describe the size, texture and color of the fall items like pumpkins, apples and leaves. Sort by similar features to practice “same” and “different”.
  • Pretend play: Gather pumpkins and apples from you sensory bin for a fall harvest! Help your child think of the ingredients needed to make fruit pies for your feast.
  • Articulation: Hide small fall-themed objects or pictures under the black bean dirt. Practice speech sounds as your child discovers hidden items and then make sentences with those words. This is also a great way to target seasonal vocabulary!

Farm & Vegetable Sensory Bin

We used this sensory bin in group therapy and our students had a blast. You can use this as a group of friends or family.

  • Speech: animal sounds are an excellent way to get our little ones exploring early consonant-vowel combinations ( like “moo, oink, baa, neigh”) and Old MacDonald provides a perfect opportunity to practice vowels when singing “e-i-e-i-o”.
  • Social Language: we made a “garden salad” for our animals to enjoy. Students labeled vegetables they found hiding in the corn and told the group which were their favorites. Everyone took turns asking follow-up questions to find out how peers liked to cook their vegetables and which of their favorite meals have vegetables. We learned our students love salad!

Summer Sensory Bin

We created two sensory bins we could pair with some favorite summer-themed books to practice

  • Articulation: Hide items that contain your child’s speech sounds in the rice or kinetic sand
  • Vocabulary: Describe the size, shape, color and other attributes of the objects found
  • Imaginative Play: Create an ocean-themed birthday party using kinetic sand and shells to make a birthday cake, decorations and presents

Valentine’s Day Sensory Bin

This bin was inspired by The Autism Helper. It uses dessert matching and rainbow rice to help students practice

  • Following multiple step directions
  • Self-advocacy (i.e. asking for help)
  • Picture description
For templates visit The Autism Helper

Check out our Pinterest page and Instagram page for more sensory bin inspiration and fun activities to target speech therapy goals in the home.

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This post written for you by Sarah Denman, M.A. CCC-SLP and the Speech Department team of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center

Now Seeking Volunteers for Halloween Hop!

By Alexa Demyan,

Columbus Speech & Hearing Center is excited to begin planning for our annual Halloween Hop! This sensory-friendly event is perfect for trick-or-treaters of all ages and a great opportunity for kids to experience a non-spooky Halloween.

We are searching for volunteers to join our Halloween Hop planning committee. The time commitment is approximately 3-5 hours per month leading up to the event with a slight increase in hours leading up to the execution of the event in October. We want to plan for the safest, most fun Halloween Hop yet!


If you’re interested in serving on the Halloween Hop planning committee, email Danielle Dobkins, Manager of Special Events and Corporate Giving, at ddobkins@columbusspeech.org.

Phonological Awareness Skills

By Alexa Demyan,

Children playing with….sounds?!?!

When most of us think about children playing, we usually think about things like blocks, puzzles, and other toys. But it’s also important for young children (and their families) to play with sounds – the sounds in their language. Doing so not only helps children learn how to pronounce these speech sounds but also helps them to become readers as well. Learning to read and write starts long before kindergarten and has long-lasting effects. Learning to play with sounds (also called “Phonological Awareness skills”) is one of the key skills of children ages 0-5 that predict later reading success. A more formal definition of Phonological Awareness is the auditory processing of spoken language (not of written language) and understanding that spoken language can be divided and manipulated into smaller components (sentences, phrases, words, syllables, phoneme clusters; individual phonemes). 

Areas included in the skill of phonological awareness are:

·     Rhyme (discrimination (“Do book and cook rhyme?”) and production (“Tell me a word that rhymes with bee”)

·     Segment (clapping out words in sentences, number of syllables, phonemes)

·     Isolation (tell the beginning/middle/end sounds in a word) and recognizing when words share phonemes (‘ball’ and ‘bat’) (also known as “alliteration”)

·     Deletion of syllables (“Say ‘cowboy’. Now say it again but don’t say ‘boy’”) and phonemes (“Say ‘fox’. Now say it again but don’t say ‘f’”)

·     Blending (“win—dow ” is “window” and “b—oy” is “boy”)

There are many ways to incorporate phonological awareness skills into your daily play with your child. Many nursery rhymes include rhyming words that you can point out to your child as you read as well as words beginning with the same sounds. You can clap out long and short words and talk about them (e.g. “cat” vs. “ballerina”). You can take turns naming as many words as you can think of that begin (or end) with the same sound (ball, baby, book, etc.). You can play “I’m thinking of an animal that barks and begins with the “d” sound. You can play “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a….” using rhyming words, words beginning with the same sound, only 1 syllable words, etc. Books are a fantastic resource for talking about and pointing out all of these skills. Talk back and forth into a play microphone or wooden spoon or in front of a mirror. You can play these games in the car or while in the bathtub or anywhere! Have fun!

Fun Reading Resources and Ideas:

•       Reading Rockets website

•       Get Ready To Read – www.getreadytoread.org

•       Reading is Fundamental website- www.rif.org

•       Reading Resource website- readingresource.net

•       www.starfall.com 

This post written for you by Lora McConnell, M.S., CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center

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Our Favorite Teletherapy Activities

By Alexa Demyan,

Over the past several months, speech therapists everywhere have been learning how to make teletherapy fun, engaging, and beneficial to their clients. The SLPs at Columbus Speech & Hearing Center have created a list of some favorite tele-friendly activities, and they can also be used with parents at home! 

Mad Libs

  • A quick Google search will allow you to find endless Mad Libs to complete at home! Work on reading, writing, sentence grammar (verbs, adjectives, plural nouns, word order…), story elements (characters, setting, problem, solution…) and more while creating silly and fun stories. 

What’s in the Bag?

  • Grab a grocery bag and take turns hiding different toys or objects from around the house inside. Whoever hides the object gives clues for the others to guess what it is! While playing this game you can practice describing (“It’s green, round, and you can eat it”), question asking (“Is it something from the kitchen?”), and perspective taking (Does the guesser have enough information? Do I need to tell them more?). 

Digital Spinners

  • Does your child need to practice some speech articulation sounds? Check out this FREE resource! Go to TeachersPayTeachers.com and search for “Free Speech and Language Digital Spinners”. Our therapists make great use of these and say that their clients love them, too! 

Trivia

  • Head to UsefulTrivia.com to find all sorts of trivia topics! From sports to comic books and many topics in between, this website is perfect for school-aged kids who are working on answering Wh- questions (who, what, when, where, why, how), creating complete sentences, or just for fun! 

Rory’s Story Cubes

  • This educational game has endless possibilities – and you do not need to be a speech therapist to take full advantage! Follow the directions included with the game to work on language skills, imagination expansion, concentration, and more. See who can make the funniest or scariest story! Available at StoryCubes.com, Amazon, and Target. 

This post written for you by Natalie Day, M.S., CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center

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Activities to Celebrate Diversity

By Alexa Demyan,

Every day, adults and children alike are learning how to be more inclusive and celebrate the beautiful diversity in our world. Here are a few activities to help you and your family listen, learn, and grow in this pursuit. 

Read

  • Reading books that have racially and culturally diverse characters help children see, learn about, and empathize with people who are different from themselves. 
  • Peekaboo Morning by Rachel Isadora is great for babies and toddlers.
  • Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman is a beautiful story of self-confidence. 
  • Whoever You Are by Mem Fox shows how children all over the world share joy and love despite living, speaking, and looking different from each other. 

Crafts

  • Craft projects will allow children to see and think about physical characteristics that make us all different. By creating these works of art themselves, they can take pride in them and appreciate the beauty in diversity.
  • Use construction paper, foam sheets, or regular paper with crayons and markers to create paper dolls with varying skin tones. Give them hair, clothes, and personalities, and start playing pretend!
  • Cut out hand prints in a rainbow of colors and/or skin tones and create a wreath. Hang it on your front door or in a window to share the love with your neighbors! 

Play

Playing pretend and imagining that they are someone else can allow children to explore the hearts and minds of others, which helps them see things from their perspectives. 

  • Learn about people like Katherine Johnson, Duke Ellington, or Jesse Owens and play pretend! 
  • Play “Guess Who?” Give clues to help your child guess the person you are thinking of. Start with simple clues such as their favorite food or the color of their hair. This can help your child start to think about and appreciate what makes us all different, but also what we have in common!

Check out our Diversity Pinterest page for more activities and ideas!

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This post written for you by Natalie Day, M.S., CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center

Partnering to Improve Communication for ALL

By Alexa Demyan,

Columbus Speech & Hearing Center hosted the 13th Annual Great Communicators Golf Classic on October 19. Though the weather was less than favorable, our event was still a success thanks to the support of our community partners!

You can learn more about the impact of our annual fundraiser by checking out this short video produced by Zinnia Films.

Watch the video on YouTube here!

Thank you to all who donated, participated in our virtual Silent Auction & Raffle, sponsored and volunteered!

Impact Sponsors

Success Sponsors

Storytelling Sponsors

Hole Sponsors

Foursomes

COMDOC, Inc. ⚫ Elford, Inc. ⚫ HMB, Inc. ⚫ The Joseph Group ⚫ Ketchum & Walton Co. ⚫ The Scotts Miracle Grow Company ⚫ TSG Advice Partners ⚫ US Bank

If you’re interested in getting involved and making an impact in your community through our annual golf outing, please reach out to ccraig@columbusspeech.org. We’re always welcoming new partners and volunteers!

What’s the Chatter About?

By Alexa Demyan,

At Columbus Speech and Hearing Center, we know that the early identification of a speech, language, or hearing disorder is critical, but that it also leads to better outcomes.

The first two years of a child’s life are a critical period for their development of speech and language skills. Communication skills are essential in building the foundation of academic readiness and the earlier a child’s disorder is detected, the sooner a family can make the best decision for their child’s language and communication approach.

At Columbus Speech and Hearing we screen more than 2,000 children a year for early detection. We work with families to provide the best services to ensure children are able to develop the language skills necessary to help them communicate freely and actively learn.

We know that numerous studies have shown a link between a child’s language skills in preschool and their academic success later in life. You can ensure your child is ready for learning with a speech, language and hearing screening.

CSHC also knows know that piece of mind for parents and caregivers is important! That’s why we offer a variety of ways for you to discuss your child’s unique speech and hearing needs with a licensed speech-language pathologist.

Chatterbox

This free program connects you with a speech-language pathologist from CSHC for a casual Q&A about your child’s speech and language development. Our SLP can also provide fresh ideas for home activities, or help you determine next-steps for your child’s continued speech and language development.

Chatterbox sessions are open to anyone who has concerns regarding their child’s speech and language development. Chatterbox sessions can take place over the phone or via email with a licensed speech-language pathologist. You can contact Lora McConnell at (614) 261-5462 or lmcconnell@columbusspeech.org.

View our flyer or follow us on instagram for more information!

In-Office Speech & Hearing Screening

Early detection and intervention increase opportunities for success in school. Our In-Office Screenings offer families a chance to have an in-person, one-to-one screening with one of our licensed speech pathologists.

Our in-office screenings are a 20-25 minute screening to assess your child in the areas of speech articulation, receptive language, expressive language, social pragmatic language, fluency, and hearing to determine if a full speech and language evaluation is warranted. We offer screenings to any child age 3-7.

In-office screenings determine if speech articulation and language skills are age-appropriate and if there is any possible hearing loss or middle ear problems. Results and recommendations are provided immediately.

In-office screenings cost $30. You can inquire about an in-office screening for your child by contacting Janel Niekamp at (614) 261-5469 or jniekamp@columbusspeech.org.

View our flyer.

Community Speech & Hearing Screening

Our Community Outreach program partners with preschools, schools, early learning centers, daycares and more to offer speech, language and hearing screenings to children 3+. These screenings help to identify children with speech, language and/or hearing problems and provide families with the appropriate recommendations and referrals resources so that any necessary treatment and intervention can be done in a timely manner.

If you are interested in learning more about community speech, language and hearing screenings, please contact your school or daycare to see if they participate in this program!

Additional Resources

Learn more by visiting our Speech Services page to see a full list of services offered!

Check out our Pinterest page and Instagram page for educational and fun activities to target speech therapy goals in the home!

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Using Video Clips to Teach Social Skills

By Alexa Demyan,

Trying to teach social skill concepts in a fun and motivating way? Video
clips can be extremely useful! As you and your child watch, you can
pause along the way to discuss relevant topics.

“For The Birds” (Pixar)

Watch the video here

Summary: A flock of small birds perch on a telephone wire when along comes a large dopey bird that tries to join them. The birds of a feather can’t help but make fun of him—and their clique mentality proves embarrassing in the end.

Ideas for discussion:

  • Emotions
    • What are they feeling?
    • How do you know? (e.g. facial expressions, body language)
    • Why might they feel that way?
  • Personal space
  • Bullying
    • Why do you think the little birds acting like that?
    • What could you say to your friends if they acted like that?
    • What could the big bird say or do?
  • Conflict resolution
    • What could they have done instead?
  • If they could talk, what do you think they’d be saying?

“Lou” (Pixar)

Watch the video here

Summary: Lou, a creature made of “Lost and Found” items must
manage the unkind behavior of the schoolyard bully, J.J., who has not
yet learned that giving can be so much more fulfilling than taking away.

Ideas for discussion:

  • Bullying
    • What is J.J. doing? How does that make the other kids feel? What could the other kids say/do?
  • Conflict resolution
  • Giving/sharing vs. taking

“Oreo Commercial” (2009)

Watch the video here

Summary: A younger brother wants to be just like his older brother – which means he needs to figure out a way to dunk his cookie in milk too! The problem is… how do you dunk your cookie given a sippy cup?

Ideas for discussion:

  • “Thinking with your Eyes”
    • Where are his eyes looking? What does that mean he’s thinking about?
  • Problem-solving
    • What’s the problem? How does he try to solve it?
    • What do you think will happen next? What would you do?
  • Nonverbal communication
    • E.g. When the older brother scoots his milk away, what is he trying to say?
    • E.g. How is the younger brother feeling when __?

“Elf” (2003)

Clips available on YouTube, full film available on dvd/bluray & various streaming platforms

Summary: Almost any scene can be used from this hilarious movie about an elf who moves to NYC.

Ideas for discussion:

  • Expected vs. Unexpected Behaviors
    • What did Buddy do? Was it expected or unexpected? Why?
    • How did that make other people feel around him? (e.g. confused, upset, uncomfortable)

Ideas for scenes:

  • Mall scene – Buddy goes to the mall for the 1st time
    • Dinner scene – Buddy eats spaghetti with syrup for dinner… with his hands! Yuk!
  • Doctor scene – Buddy eats cotton balls and won’t sit still, which makes his dad and the doctor upset.

Want to share?  This article is a sharable PDF as well.

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This post written for you by Sarah Denman, M.A. CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center

Games and Activities to Prevent Bullying

By Alexa Demyan,

Bullying is often a tough subject for parents and children alike, but teaching things like empathy, self-confidence, and the appreciation of people’s differences – all of which can reduce bullying behaviors – can be fun! Try these games with your pre-school and school aged kids to stop bullying before it starts.

  1. Play “guess who?”: Give clues to help your child guess the person you are thinking of. Start with simple clues such as their favorite food or the color of their hair. This can help your child start to think about and appreciate what makes us all different!
  2. Create family portraits: Craft portraits of your family, as well as other families in your circle. Talk about how each family is similar to and different from your own, and list the special things that each family brings to your life. Most importantly, discuss one thing that all families have in common – they all love each other!
  3. Chart similarities and differences: Help your child recognize and accept what makes our differences beautiful, and use some math skills while you’re at it! Make a simple chart of characteristics, hobbies, and traits such as “tall, funny, wears glasses, speaks Spanish, loves donuts, etc…) and see how the people in your life add to the variety of your community.
  4. Imagine being someone else: Let’s use pretend play to teach empathy! When children pretend to be someone else (or even the family pet!) they explore the hearts and minds of others, which helps them see things from different perspectives.
  5. Help give back to your community: A strong community supports its members, and one way to help your child engage with theirs is to help them understand their role. Talk about ways your child can be a helper to their family, friends, neighbors, and classmates through acts of kindness, and then put those ideas into action!

Source: https://www.kindercare.com/content-hub/articles/2019/october/5-preschool-games-to-prevent-bullying?utm_campaign=KC-email&utm_medium=Email&utm_source=Act-On&utm_content=Newsletter&utm_term=October

Learning empathy through perspective-taking is a crucial life skill that all children should work to acquire.

❤️

When they need additional help learning this skill, our speech therapists are ready to teach them! Through individual therapy, group therapy and/or co-treatment sessions, we make sure teaching this concept is a priority for clients with social language needs. Why? Because perspective taking, empathy and sympathy are embedded in our everyday lives and part of most “hidden rules” in social communication.

Contact us at 614-263-5151 or speech@columbusspeech.org to learn more

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This post written for you by Natalie Day, M.S., CCC-SLP of Columbus Speech & Hearing Center